Mohsen Namjoo tickets               

 

Saturday, April 27, 2019

7pm: Pre-performance slide lecture by co-curator Rajika Puri: “What makes an Indian dancer great?”

8pm: Performance

 

Peter Norton Symphony Space

2537 Broadway, Manhattan

 

$25-$55

Make it a family affair, bring your children (14 years and under) for $5. 

 

INFO ON DANCING THE GODS NIGHT TWO: SUJATA MOHAPATRA

 

Post-performance “Chat & Chai” with the performers

 

Rama Vaidyanathan is one of the foremost Bharatanatyam dancers of her generation. She trained intensively under the legendary dancer Yamini Krishnamurthy and the celebrated guru Saroja Vaidyanathan. In a career spanning more than 30 years, Rama has developed an individual style based on a strong sense of conviction and an extraordinary flair for choreography that does not forsake the core principles of her dance form. Grounded in tradition, the innumerable dance compositions she has added to the Bharatanatyam repertoire and her latest group work Vivartana demonstrate how her unique thought process pushes boundaries.

 

Rama, who opened the very first Dancing the Gods festival in 2011, has taken the art of Bharatanatyam around the world, and been awarded several titles by leading cultural institutions in India. She is the recipient of the latest Sangeet Natak Akademi Puraskar award. As Director of Ganesa Natyalaya, New Delhi and through her over-subscribed workshops when on tour, she has been actively engaged in teaching for twenty-five years - and thus inspiring - a whole generation of dancers.

 

VIVARTANA features a highly acclaimed group work with six of her senior disciples, including her daughter Dakshina Vaidyanathan who danced in her duet show DVITA (Dancing the Gods 2015).

 

Her range, intelligence and mastery have made a deeper impression each time - Alastair Macaulay / The New York Times

 

BHARATANATYAM, the dance form that arose in the temples of south India, is regarded as the paradigm of Indian classical dance forms. By tradition a solo dance performed only by women, its modern name and theoretical base hearken back to the 2ndC Sanskrit text on drama: Natya Shastra. A compendium of the elements of Indian theater from hand gesture and ways of walking to the emotions it can convey, this ancient treatise is today revered by dance-theater artists and scholars in India and across the globe.